Let’s move toward better science

Isaac Newton once said “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants” (cit. I. Newton). He could have never reached his personal achievements without the knowledge and discoveries from centuries before him, like Copernicus or Kepler or Galilei. Sharing data inRead More

Can we trick melanoma? Unveiling novel solutions to relapse.

Cancer is a heterogeneous disease. However, it has some common features across the different existing types. One of those is relapse. Relapse is defined as “to fall back into the state of illness after apparent recovery”. Every day, researchers are trying to understand why and how cancer returns, andRead More

Dat(a)s The Spirit! Managing data for Melanoma research

Pop quiz! What do the following items have in common? 2,120 Playstation 4 consoles 33,125 iPhones (32GB) 21 million mp3 music files And the answer is – 1060000000000000 bytes of data. That’s 1.06 petabytes-which is an awful lot of information! Interestingly, this also happens to be the amount ofRead More

Cancer epigenetic research as a bridge between academia–industry partnerships

Cancer epigenetics is an area of ongoing research that deepens our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer and creates new avenues for the identification of novel therapeutic targets. The term “epigenetics” was originally proposed by Conrad Waddington in 1942 to describe the molecular mechanisms independent of alterations inRead More

Enjoy the sun safely! Simple precautions to save your skin

The incidence of skin cancers has been increasing worldwide over the past decades in an alarming rate. One of the reasons is the thinning ozone sphere, causing overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. On the other hand, bad outdoor habits that are common nowadays help the increasing danger for melanoma development. BothRead More

Familial melanoma: Risk of disease as an inherited disorder

It is now widely appreciated that cancer may arise from multifactorial contributors both genetic and environmental. In approximately 10% of melanoma cases multiple family members are affected. Familial melanoma defines the occurrence of 3 or more melanomas in a family, 2 of which are found in first-degree relatives (Figure1).Read More

It’s all in the genes

While the majority of cancers are not hereditary, some do occur multiple times within the same family. A well-known example of this is breast cancer, where mutations in the BRCA genes (BRCA1/BRCA2) predispose to breast cancer, with notable patients including Angelina Jolie. Melanoma, too, can sometimes be passed fromRead More

What scientists mean by “heterogeneity” and why you should care

The term “diversity” is frequently circulated in our modern world. We are all different: we look different, have different personalities, and like different things. This is easy for us to understand and accept, yet it is only recently that this truth has been acknowledged in for example cancer drug development.Read More